Infertility Myths Unveiled


Infertility is defined as the inability to get pregnant after 12 months of regular, unprotected sexual intercourse. 

1 in 10 American couples are diagnosed as infertile each year. This diagnosis can have huge implications on a relationship, altering it dramatically. The diagnosis can lead to depression, anxiety and a sense of shame as it threatens the lifelong expectations of hopes of parenthood.

Luckily, not all hope is to be lost. Medical advances such as in-vitro fertilization (IVF) have made it possible for many couples who were deemed 'infertile' to conceive. However, fertility treatments such as these do carry risks. These treatments and risks can often be misunderstood.

Here are five common misconceptions:

1 - Women are more likely to be infertile than men

Due to the woman carrying the baby, not the man, people often think that the infertility issue must be related to the female anatomy. When in fact, men and women are equally responsible. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the National Institutes of Health, there is an even split between putting the onus on the male, female and the couple. 1/3 of cases are down to the male, 1/3 of cases are attributable to the female and the rest are either both sides of the couple or unexplained.

The primary causes of infertility in males is low sperm count, poor sperm movement and abnormal sperm shape. The causes for women are irregular ovulation, endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome and diminished ovarian reserve due to age.

2 - Stress causes infertility

Anyone that has experienced infertility has at some point if their journey has gotten advice such as "Relax, you're trying too hard. Just take a break and you'll get pregnant."

While stress and infertility have been linked, stress does not cause infertility. Although, the research does not fully account for the indirect effects of stress, such as alcohol use, increased smoking, infrequent sex and dropping out of treatment.

Some studies have found that seeking counselling to help with the stress may improve pregnancy rates. Other studies have found this to only be evident in couples not receiving medical treatments. It's true that counselling can help couples reduce stress and cope more effectively but they should not expect that counselling will increase their chances of pregnancy.

Overall, the thought that stress causes infertility unfairly places the responsibility for treatment failure or success on the shoulders of the woman, a conclusion which is not supported by science.

3 - IVF works for most patients

4 - The Doctor can tell you what you need to know

5 - Science and healthy living have extended the biological clock

 

Galway Fertility Clinic Referrals

Galway Fertility Clinic
Brooklawn House,
Galway West Business Park,
Rahoon, Galway

Email: gpreferrals@fertilityclinic.ie
Fax: 091 515280

Private Appointment (Galway Fertility Clinic)

Once our appointment coordinator receives a private referral, they will arrange an appointment within 2-4 weeks.

Simply click here to arrange your appointment.

Appointment Coordinator
Phone: 091-515600
Fax: 091-515280
Email: gpreferrals@fertilityclinic.ie


Contact Hours

Galway Fertility Clinic operates from:
9:00am – 3:30pm Monday to Friday.

However certain services (given their scope) are restricted to specific timetables. Some services are provided during weekend hours as required.

Appointments are necessary for all visits to the clinic.

Opening Hours

Galway Fertility Clinic operates from:
8.15am – 4pm Monday to Friday.

However certain services (given their scope) are restricted to specific timetables. Some services are provided during weekend hours as required.

Appointments are necessary for all visits to the clinic.

VhiGalway Fertility Unit, along with ReproMed Ireland, is proud to be in partnership with VHI to provide to qualified members, savings of up to €4805 through their fertility treatment at our clinics